2018 Election ELECTION 2018: Here’s what Cullman County voters will see on their Nov. 6 ballots | The Cullman Tribune

2018 Election

ELECTION 2018: Here’s what Cullman County voters will see on their Nov. 6 ballots

CULLMAN - The General and Constitutional Amendment Election will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Cullman County Judge of Probate Tammy Brown, whose office oversees elections locally, is optimistic about the number of voters who will come out to the polls, even with wet weather predicted for Election Day.

“I am expecting a large voter turnout, but weather can play a part in voter turnout,” said Brown. “Even with weather predictions being rain and/or storms Tuesday, I hope people will go vote but be safe.”

In addition to several statewide races, Cullman County voters will see a handful of local races, but only one in which there is opposition: Cullman County Coroner Jeremy L. Kilpatrick, a Republican, is facing challenger and former Cullman County Coroner Gary Murphree, who is a Democrat.

Voters will also decide four state constitutional amendments, dealing with the 10 Commandments, abortion, the University of Alabama Board of Trustees and vacancies in the Alabama House of Representatives and Senate. One local amendment will address how the money for feeding inmates in the Cullman County Detention Center is managed.

New in this election, all Cullman County polling locations will be equipped with ExpressPoll Tablet electronic pollbooks, which means that voter check-in will be done electronically by poll workers.

Below are the races and amendments Cullman County voters will see on their ballots Tuesday:

State

Governor

(D) Walt Maddox

(R) Kay Ivey

Lieutenant Governor

(D) Will Boyd

(R) Will Ainsworth

United States Representative, 4th Congressional District

(D) Lee Auman

(R) Robert Aderholt

Attorney General

(D) Joseph Siegelman

(R) Steve Marshall

State Senator, District 4

(R) Garlan Gudger

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court

(D) Bob Vance, Jr.

(R) Tom Parker

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Place 1

(R) Sarah Hicks Stewart

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Place 2

(R) Tommy Bryan

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Place 3

(R) Will Sellers

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Place 4

(D) Donna Wesson Smalley

(R) Jay Mitchell

Court of Civil Appeals Jude, Place 1

(R) Christy Olinger Edwards

Court of Civil Appeals Jude, Place 2

(R) Chad Hanson

Court of Civil Appeals Jude, Place 3

(R) Terry A. Moore

Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 1

(R) Richard Minor

Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 2

(R) Chris McCool

Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3

(R) Bill Cole

Secretary of State

(D) Heather Milam

(R) John H. Merrill

State Treasurer

(R) John McMillan

State Auditor

(D) Miranda Karrine Joseph

(R) Jim Zeigler

Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries

(R) Rick Pate

Public Service Commission, Place 1

(D) Cara Y. McClure

(R) Jeremy H. Oden

Public Service Commission, Place 2

(D) Kari Powell

(R) Chris “Chip” Beeker Jr.

Member, State Board of Education, District 6

(R) Cynthia McCarty

State Representative, District 9

(R) Scott Stadthagen

State Representative, District 11

(R) Randall Shedd

State Representative, District 12

(R) Corey Harbison

 

Local

Member, Cullman County Board of Education, Fairview/District 2

(R) Shane Rusk

Member, Cullman County Board of Education, Hanceville/District 4

(R) Kenny Brockman

Member, Cullman County Board of Education, Vinemont/District 6

(R) Mike Graves

Member, Cullman County Board of Education, Good Hope/District 7

(R) Kerry Neighbors

Circuit Court Judge, 32nd Judicial Circuit, Place 1

(R) Gregory A. Nicholas

Circuit Court Judge, 32nd Judicial Circuit, Place 2

(R) Martha Evans Williams

District Court Judge, Cullman county, Place 2

(R) Wells “Rusty” Turner, III

Circuit Clerk, Cullman County

(R) Lisa Parker McSwain

Cullman County Judge of Probate

(R) Tammy Brown

Cullman County Coroner

(D) Gary Murphree

(R) Jeremy L. Kilpatrick

Member, Cullman County Commission, Place 1

(R) Kerry Watson

Member, Cullman County Commission, Place 2

(R) Garry Marchman

Cullman County Sheriff

(R) Matt Gentry

 

Constitutional Amendments

Proposed Statewide Amendment No. 1 (The Ten Commandments)

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, providing for certain religious rights and liberties; authorizing the display of the Ten Commandments on state property and property owned or administrated by a public school or public body; and prohibiting the expenditure of public funds in defense of the constitutionality of this amendment. (Proposed by Act 2018-389)

YES-Statewide Amendment No. 1

NO-Statewide Amendment No. 1

What is this?

Under current law, the state constitution contains no language related to the display of the Ten Commandments.

Amendment 1 does two things. First, it provides that a person is free to worship God as he or she chooses, and that a person’s religious beliefs will have no effect on his or her civil or political rights. Second, it makes clear that the Ten Commandments may be displayed on public property so long as the display meets constitutional requirements, such as being displayed along with historical or educational items. Amendment 1 also provides that no public funds may be used to defend this amendment in court.

If a majority of voters vote "Yes" on Amendment 1, the state constitution will provide that a person is free to worship God as he or she chooses and that a person’s religious beliefs will have no effect on his or her civil or political rights. It will also provide that the Ten Commandments can be displayed on public property so long as the display meets constitutional requirements, such as being displayed along with historical or educational items.

If a majority of voters vote "No" on Amendment 1, no language related to the display of the Ten Commandments would be included in the state constitution.
There is no cost for Amendment 1. No public funds may be used to defend this amendment in court.

The Constitutional authority for passage of Amendment 1 is set forth in Sections 284, 285 and 287 of the State Constitution. These sections outline the way a constitutional amendment may be put to the people of the State for a vote. (https://sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/voter/ballot-measures/statewide)

Proposed Statewide Amendment No. 2 (Abortion)

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, as amended; to declare and otherwise affirm that it is the public policy of this state to recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, most importantly the right to life in all manners and measures appropriate and lawful; and to provide that the constitution of this state does not protect the right to abortion or require the funding of abortion. (Proposed by Act 2017-188)

YES-Statewide Amendment No. 2

NO-Statewide Amendment No. 2

What is this?

Under current law, the state constitution does not include any language that directly relates to the importance of unborn life or the rights of unborn children, nor does it include any language that directly relates to abortion or the funding of abortions using state funds.

Amendment 2 provides that it would be the public policy of the state to recognize and support the importance of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, including the right to life; and to protect the rights of unborn children. Additionally, the amendment would make clear that the state constitution does not include a right to abortion or require the funding of an abortion using public funds.

The proposed amendment does not identify any specific actions or activities as unlawful. It expresses a public policy that supports broad protections for the rights of unborn children as long as the protections are lawful.

If a majority of voters vote "Yes" on Amendment 2, the public policy of this state will be to support and protect the importance of unborn life and the rights of unborn children. The state constitution would also not include a right to an abortion or to the funding of an abortion using public funds.

If a majority of voters vote "No" on Amendment 2, there would be no language in the state constitution related to the importance of unborn life or protecting the rights of unborn children, or to abortion or the funding of abortions using public funds.

There is no cost for Amendment 2.

The Constitutional authority for passage of Amendment 2 is set forth in Sections 284, 285 and 287 of the State Constitution. These sections outline the way a constitutional amendment may be put to the people of the State for a vote. (https://sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/voter/ballot-measures/statewide)

Proposed Statewide Amendment No. 3 (University of Alabama Board of Trustees)

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, relating to the Board of Trustees of the University of Alabama, to specify that the congressional districts from which members are appointed continue to reflect those as constituted on January 1, 2018, to remove the State Superintendent of Education from membership, and to delete the requirement that members vacate office at the annual meeting of the board following their seventieth birthday. (Proposed by Act 2018-132)

YES-Statewide Amendment No. 3

NO-Statewide Amendment No. 3

What is this?

Under current law, the University of Alabama Board of Trustees is composed of 16 people: three members from the congressional district in which the Tuscaloosa campus is located, two members from each of the other six congressional districts in the state, the Governor, and the State Superintendent of Education. So, if the number of congressional districts in Alabama increased or decreased in the future, the number of trustees would also increase or decrease. Additionally, other than the Governor and the State Superintendent of Education, current law requires a trustee to retire from the board following his or her seventieth birthday.

Amendment 3 does three things. First, it provides that the board will be composed of members from congressional districts as those districts existed on January 1, 2018, meaning any future changes to the number of congressional districts in Alabama would not impact the number of board members. Second, it removes the State Superintendent of Education from automatically having a seat on the board. Third, it allows a trustee to serve after his or her seventieth birthday.

If a majority of voters vote "Yes" on Amendment 3, future changes to the number of congressional districts in Alabama will not impact the number of board members, the State Superintendent of Education will no longer automatically be a member of the board, and trustees will be allowed to serve on the board after their seventieth birthday.

If a majority of voters vote "No" on Amendment 3, future changes to the number of congressional districts in Alabama will impact the number of board members, the State Superintendent of Education will continue to automatically have a seat on the board, and trustees will not be allowed to serve on the board after their seventieth birthday.

There is no cost for Amendment 3.

The Constitutional authority for passage of Amendment 3 is set forth in Sections 284, 285 and 287 of the State Constitution. These sections outline the way a constitutional amendment may be put to the people of the State for a vote. (https://sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/voter/ballot-measures/statewide)

Proposed Statewide Amendment No. 4 (House of Representatives or Senate vacancies)

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to provide that, if a vacancy in either the House of Representatives or the Senate occurs on or after October 1 of the third year of a quadrennium, the seat would remain vacant until a successor is elected at the next succeeding general election. (Proposed by Act 2018-276)

YES-Statewide Amendment No. 4

NO-Statewide Amendment No. 4

What is this?

Under current law, members of the state legislature are elected to four-year terms of office that begin and end on Election Day in November. This four-year period is known as a quadrennium. When a person who was elected to serve in the state legislature is unable to complete his or her term, a vacancy is created. When this vacancy occurs, the Governor is required to schedule a special election. The winner of the special election fills the vacancy for the rest of the term.

Amendment 4 provides that when a vacancy occurs in the state legislature on or after October 1 of year three of the four-year term, the seat will remain vacant until the next general election, which occurs in November of the fourth year of the term. The Governor would no longer have the power to schedule a special election to fill a vacancy in these circumstances, and public funds that would have been spent on the special election would be saved.

If a majority of voters vote "Yes" on Amendment 4, state legislative seats that become vacant within the final 14 months of the four-year term of office will remain vacant until the general election.

If a majority of voters vote "No" on Amendment 4, the Governor will continue to be required to schedule a special election whenever a vacancy occurs in the state legislature.

There is no cost for Amendment 4.

The Constitutional authority for passage of Amendment 4 is set forth in Sections 284, 285 and 287 of the State Constitution. These sections outline the way a constitutional amendment may be put to the people of the State for a vote. (https://sos.alabama.gov/alabama-votes/voter/ballot-measures/statewide)

Proposed Local Amendment No. 1 (The sheriff’s food bill)

Relating to Cullman County, proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Alabama of 1901, to provide that effective beginning the next term of office of the sheriff, all allowances or amounts received by the sheriff for feeding prisoners would be deposited in a special account and used for feeding prisoners in the county jail and any excess in the fund would be authorized to be used for law enforcement purposes by the sheriff and to provide that, at that time, the annual salary of the Sheriff of Cullman County would be equal to the annual salary of the Judge of Probate of Cullman County. (Proposed by Act 2018-409)

YES-Local Amendment No. 1

NO-Local Amendment No. 1

What is this?

In February 2018, sponsor Rep. Corey Harbison, R-Good Hope and co-sponsors Rep. Randall Shedd, R-Fairview and Rep. Ed Henry, R-Hartselle, with support from Cullman County Sheriff Matt Gentry, introduced House Bill 461, proposing that citizens vote on an amendment to the state constitution that would remove all food money from the personal control of any Cullman County Sheriff.  Sen. Paul Bussman, R-Cullman supported the bill when it moved to the Alabama Senate.

The proposed amendment covers all food funding from any source, reading:

Effective beginning the next term of office of the Sheriff of Cullman County after the ratification of this amendment, any allowances or other amounts received by the sheriff for feeding prisoners shall be deposited in a separate account in the county treasury to be known as the "Sheriff's Discretionary Fund" and shall be used by the sheriff for the feeding of prisoners in the county jail. Any funds in the Sheriff's Discretionary Fund over the amounts needed for feeding prisoners may be used by the sheriff for law enforcement purposes and for the operation of the office of the sheriff. Any funds in the Sheriff's Discretionary Fund shall be carried over from year to year. In the event additional amounts are needed by the sheriff for the feeding of prisoners, the amounts shall be paid by the sheriff from any other discretionary funds available for the operation of the office of the sheriff. The sheriff shall not be subject to the competitive bid law for the purchase of food or supplies used for feeding prisoners in the county jail.

SAMPLE BALLOT: Cullman General Election 2018- Front by TheCullmanTribune on Scribd

SAMPLE BALLOT: Statewide Generic- Back by TheCullmanTribune on Scribd

ExpressPoll Tablet Flier by TheCullmanTribune on Scribd

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